Emma Watson Pussy
War And Peace 55


Banned Celebs






Emma Watson Pussy



Books:

Anna Karenina


War And Peace



have been otherwise at this meeting. "Ah! my dear!... Ah! Mary!" they suddenly exclaimed, and then laughed. "I dreamed last night..."--"You were not expecting us?..." "Ah! Mary, you have got thinner?..." "And you have grown stouter!..." "I knew the princess at once," put in Mademoiselle Bourienne. "And I had no idea!..." exclaimed Princess Mary. "Ah, Andrew, I did not see you." Prince Andrew and his sister, hand in hand, kissed one another, and he told her she was still the same crybaby as ever. Princess Mary had turned toward her brother, and through her tears the loving, warm, gentle look of her large luminous eyes, very beautiful at that moment, rested on Prince Andrews face. The little princess talked incessantly, her short, downy upper lip continually and rapidly touching her rosy nether lip when necessary and drawing up again next moment when her face broke into a smile of glittering teeth and sparkling eyes. She told of an accident they had had on the Spasski Hill which might have been serious for her in her condition, and immediately after that informed them that she had left all her clothes in Petersburg and that heaven knew what she would have to dress in here; and that Andrew had quite changed, and that Kitty Odyntsova had married an old man, and that there was a suitor for Mary, a real one, but that they would talk of that later. Princess Mary was still looking silently at her brother and her beautiful eyes were full of love and sadness. It was plain that she was following a train of thought independent of her sister-in-laws words. In the midst of a description of the last Petersburg fete she addressed her brother: "So you are really going to the war, Andrew?" she said sighing. Lise sighed too. "Yes, and even tomorrow," replied her brother. "He is leaving me here, God knows why, when he might have had promotion..." Princess Mary did not listen to the end, but continuing her train of thought turned to her sister-in-law with a tender glance at her figure. "Is it certain?" she said. The face of the little princess changed. She sighed and said: "Yes, quite certain. Ah! it is very dreadful..." Her lip descended. She brought her face close to her sister-in-laws and unexpectedly again began to cry. "She needs rest," said Prince Andrew with a frown. "Dont you, Lise? Take her to your room and Ill go to Father. How is he? Just the same?" "Yes, just the same. Though I dont know what your opinion will be," answered the princess joyfully. "And are the hours the same? And the walks in the avenues? And the lathe?" asked Prince Andrew with a scarcely perceptible smile which showed that, in spite of all his love and respect for his father, he was aware of his weaknesses. "The hours are the same, and the lathe, and also the mathematics and my geometry lessons," said Princess Mary gleefully, as if her lessons in geometry were among the greatest delights of her life. When the twenty minutes had elapsed and the time had come for the old prince to get up, Tikhon came to call the young prince to his father. The old man made a departure from his usual routine in honor of his sons arrival: he gave orders to admit him to his apartments while he dressed for dinner. The old prince always dressed in old-fashioned style, wearing an antique coat and powdered hair; and when Prince Andrew entered his fathers dressing room (not with the contemptuous look and manner he wore in drawing rooms, but with the animated face with which he talked to Pierre), the old man was sitting on a large leather-covered chair, wrapped in a powdering mantle, entrusting his head to Tikhon. "Ah! heres the warrior! Wants to vanquish Buonaparte?" said the old man, shaking his powdered head as much as the tail, which Tikhon was holding fast to plait, would allow. "You at least must tackle him properly, or else if he goes on like this hell soon have us, too, for his subjects! How are you?" And he held out his cheek. The old man was in a good temper after his nap before dinner. (He used to say that a nap "after dinner was silver--before dinner, golden.") He cast happy, sidelong glances at his son from under his thick, bushy eyebrows. Prince Andrew went up and kissed his father on the spot indicated to him. He made no reply on his fathers favorite topic--making fun of the military men of the day, and more particularly of Bonaparte. "Yes, Father, I

War And Peace page 54        War And Peace page 56