Emma Watson Pussy
War And Peace 415


Banned Celebs






Emma Watson Pussy



Books:

Anna Karenina


War And Peace



on and behind his back. His old sister-in-law popped in a small bundle, and one of the coachmen helped him into the vehicle. "There! There! Womens fuss! Women, women!" said Alpatych, puffing and speaking rapidly just as the prince did, and he climbed into the trap. After giving the clerk orders about the work to be done, Alpatych, not trying to imitate the prince now, lifted the hat from his bald head and crossed himself three times. "If there is anything... come back, Yakov Alpatych! For Christs sake think of us!" cried his wife, referring to the rumors of war and the enemy. "Women, women! Womens fuss!" muttered Alpatych to himself and started on his journey, looking round at the fields of yellow rye and the still-green, thickly growing oats, and at other quite black fields just being plowed a second time. As he went along he looked with pleasure at the years splendid crop of corn, scrutinized the strips of ryefield which here and there were already being reaped, made his calculations as to the sowing and the harvest, and asked himself whether he had not forgotten any of the princes orders. Having baited the horses twice on the way, he arrived at the town toward evening on the fourth of August. Alpatych kept meeting and overtaking baggage trains and troops on the road. As he approached Smolensk he heard the sounds of distant firing, but these did not impress him. What struck him most was the sight of a splendid field of oats in which a camp had been pitched and which was being mown down by the soldiers, evidently for fodder. This fact impressed Alpatych, but in thinking about his own business he soon forgot it. All the interests of his life for more than thirty years had been bounded by the will of the prince, and he never went beyond that limit. Everything not connected with the execution of the princes orders did not interest and did not even exist for Alpatych. On reaching Smolensk on the evening of the fourth of August he put up in the Gachina suburb across the Dnieper, at the inn kept by Ferapontov, where he had been in the habit of putting up for the last thirty years. Some thirty years ago Ferapontov, by Alpatychs advice, had bought a wood from the prince, had begun to trade, and now had a house, an inn, and a corn dealers shop in that province. He was a stout, dark, red-faced peasant in the forties, with thick lips, a broad knob of a nose, similar knobs over his black frowning brows, and a round belly. Wearing a waistcoat over his cotton shirt, Ferapontov was standing before his shop which opened onto the street. On seeing Alpatych he went up to him. "Youre welcome, Yakov Alpatych. Folks are leaving the town, but you have come to it," said he. "Why are they leaving the town?" asked Alpatych. "Thats what I say. Folks are foolish! Always afraid of the French." "Womens fuss, womens fuss!" said Alpatych. "Just what I think, Yakov Alpatych. What I say is: orders have been given not to let them in, so that must be right. And the peasants are asking three rubles for carting--it isnt Christian!" Yakov Alpatych heard without heeding. He asked for a samovar and for hay for his horses, and when he had had his tea he went to bed. All night long troops were moving past the inn. Next morning Alpatych donned a jacket he wore only in town and went out on business. It was a sunny morning and by eight oclock it was already hot. "A good day for harvesting," thought Alpatych. From beyond the town firing had been heard since early morning. At eight oclock the booming of cannon was added to the sound of musketry. Many people were hurrying through the streets and there were many soldiers, but cabs were still driving about, tradesmen stood at their shops, and service was being held in the churches as usual. Alpatych went to the shops, to government offices, to the post office, and to the Governors. In the offices and shops and at the post office everyone was talking about the army and about the enemy who was already attacking the town, everybody was asking what should be done, and all were trying to calm one another. In front of the Governors house Alpatych found a large number of people, Cossacks, and a traveling carriage of the Governors. At the porch he met two of the landed gentry, one of whom he knew. This man, an ex-captain

War And Peace page 414        War And Peace page 416