Emma Watson Pussy
War And Peace 347


Banned Celebs






Emma Watson Pussy



Books:

Anna Karenina


War And Peace



still more attentively and noticed that at dinner and all that evening Natasha was in a strange and unnatural state. She answered questions at random, began sentences she did not finish, and laughed at everything. After tea Sonya noticed a housemaid at Natashas door timidly waiting to let her pass. She let the girl go in, and then listening at the door learned that another letter had been delivered. Then suddenly it became clear to Sonya that Natasha had some dreadful plan for that evening. Sonya knocked at her door. Natasha did not let her in. "She will run away with him!" thought Sonya. "She is capable of anything. There was something particularly pathetic and resolute in her face today. She cried as she said good-by to Uncle," Sonya remembered. "Yes, thats it, she means to elope with him, but what am I to do?" thought she, recalling all the signs that clearly indicated that Natasha had some terrible intention. "The count is away. What am I to do? Write to Kuragin demanding an explanation? But what is there to oblige him to reply? Write to Pierre, as Prince Andrew asked me to in case of some misfortune?... But perhaps she really has already refused Bolkonski--she sent a letter to Princess Mary yesterday. And Uncle is away...." To tell Marya Dmitrievna who had such faith in Natasha seemed to Sonya terrible. "Well, anyway," thought Sonya as she stood in the dark passage, "now or never I must prove that I remember the familys goodness to me and that I love Nicholas. Yes! If I dont sleep for three nights Ill not leave this passage and will hold her back by force and will and not let the family be disgraced," thought she. CHAPTER XVI Anatole had lately moved to Dolokhovs. The plan for Natalie Rostovas abduction had been arranged and the preparations made by Dolokhov a few days before, and on the day that Sonya, after listening at Natashas door, resolved to safeguard her, it was to have been put into execution. Natasha had promised to come out to Kuragin at the back porch at ten that evening. Kuragin was to put her into a troyka he would have ready and to drive her forty miles to the village of Kamenka, where an unfrocked priest was in readiness to perform a marriage ceremony over them. At Kamenka a relay of horses was to wait which would take them to the Warsaw highroad, and from there they would hasten abroad with post horses. Anatole had a passport, an order for post horses, ten thousand rubles he had taken from his sister and another ten thousand borrowed with Dolokhovs help. Two witnesses for the mock marriage--Khvostikov, a retired petty official whom Dolokhov made use of in his gambling transactions, and Makarin, a retired hussar, a kindly, weak fellow who had an unbounded affection for Kuragin--were sitting at tea in Dolokhovs front room. In his large study, the walls of which were hung to the ceiling with Persian rugs, bearskins, and weapons, sat Dolokhov in a traveling cloak and high boots, at an open desk on which lay abacus and some bundles of paper money. Anatole, with uniform unbuttoned, walked to and fro from the room where the witnesses were sitting, through the study to the room behind, where his French valet and others were packing the last of his things. Dolokhov was counting the money and noting something down. "Well," he said, "Khvostikov must have two thousand." "Give it to him, then," said Anatole. "Makarka" (their name for Makarin) "will go through fire and water for you for nothing. So here are our accounts all settled," said Dolokhov, showing him the memorandum. "Is that right?" "Yes, of course," returned Anatole, evidently not listening to Dolokhov and looking straight before him with a smile that did not leave his face. Dolokhov banged down the lid of his desk and turned to Anatole with an ironic smile: "Do you know? Youd really better drop it all. Theres still time!" "Fool," retorted Anatole. "Dont talk nonsense! If you only knew... its the devil knows what!" "No, really, give it up!" said Dolokhov. "I am speaking seriously. Its no joke, this plot youve hatched." "What, teasing again? Go to the devil! Eh?" said Anatole, making a grimace. "Really its no time for your stupid jokes," and he left the room. Dolokhov smiled contemptuously and condescendingly when Anatole had gone out. "You wait a bit," he called after him. "Im not joking, Im talking sense. Come here, come here!" Anatole returned and looked at Dolokhov, trying to give him his attention and evidently submitting to

War And Peace page 346        War And Peace page 348