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War And Peace 331


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but its not nice to enter a family against a fathers will. One wants to do it peacefully and lovingly. Youre a clever girl and youll know how to manage. Be kind, and use your wits. Then all will be well." Natasha remained silent, from shyness Marya Dmitrievna supposed, but really because she disliked anyone interfering in what touched her love of Prince Andrew, which seemed to her so apart from all human affairs that no one could understand it. She loved and knew Prince Andrew, he loved her only, and was to come one of these days and take her. She wanted nothing more. "You see I have known him a long time and am also fond of Mary, your future sister-in-law. Husbands sisters bring up blisters, but this one wouldnt hurt a fly. She has asked me to bring you two together. Tomorrow youll go with your father to see her. Be very nice and affectionate to her: youre younger than she. When he comes, hell find you already know his sister and father and are liked by them. Am I right or not? Wont that be best?" "Yes, it will," Natasha answered reluctantly. CHAPTER VII Next day, by Marya Dmitrievnas advice, Count Rostov took Natasha to call on Prince Nicholas Bolkonski. The count did not set out cheerfully on this visit, at heart he felt afraid. He well remembered the last interview he had had with the old prince at the time of the enrollment, when in reply to an invitation to dinner he had had to listen to an angry reprimand for not having provided his full quota of men. Natasha, on the other hand, having put on her best gown, was in the highest spirits. "They cant help liking me," she thought. "Everybody always has liked me, and I am so willing to do anything they wish, so ready to be fond of him--for being his father--and of her--for being his sister--that there is no reason for them not to like me..." They drove up to the gloomy old house on the Vozdvizhenka and entered the vestibule. "Well, the Lord have mercy on us!" said the count, half in jest, half in earnest; but Natasha noticed that her father was flurried on entering the anteroom and inquired timidly and softly whether the prince and princess were at home. When they had been announced a perturbation was noticeable among the servants. The footman who had gone to announce them was stopped by another in the large hall and they whispered to one another. Then a maidservant ran into the hall and hurriedly said something, mentioning the princess. At last an old, cross looking footman came and announced to the Rostovs that the prince was not receiving, but that the princess begged them to walk up. The first person who came to meet the visitors was Mademoiselle Bourienne. She greeted the father and daughter with special politeness and showed them to the princess room. The princess, looking excited and nervous, her face flushed in patches, ran in to meet the visitors, treading heavily, and vainly trying to appear cordial and at ease. From the first glance Princess Mary did not like Natasha. She thought her too fashionably dressed, frivolously gay and vain. She did not at all realize that before having seen her future sister-in-law she was prejudiced against her by involuntary envy of her beauty, youth, and happiness, as well as by jealousy of her brothers love for her. Apart from this insuperable antipathy to her, Princess Mary was agitated just then because on the Rostovs being announced, the old prince had shouted that he did not wish to see them, that Princess Mary might do so if she chose, but they were not to be admitted to him. She had decided to receive them, but feared lest the prince might at any moment indulge in some freak, as he seemed much upset by the Rostovs visit. "There, my dear princess, Ive brought you my songstress," said the count, bowing and looking round uneasily as if afraid the old prince might appear. "I am so glad you should get to know one another... very sorry the prince is still ailing," and after a few more commonplace remarks he rose. "If youll allow me to leave my Natasha in your hands for a quarter of an hour, Princess, Ill drive round to see Anna Semenovna, its quite near in the Dogs Square, and then Ill come back for her." The count had devised this diplomatic ruse (as he afterwards told his daughter) to give the future

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