Emma Watson Pussy
War And Peace 164


Banned Celebs






Emma Watson Pussy



Books:

Anna Karenina


War And Peace



the other. He could distinctly see the distraught yet angry expression on the faces of these two men, who evidently did not realize what they were doing. "What are they about?" thought Prince Andrew as he gazed at them. "Why doesnt the red-haired gunner run away as he is unarmed? Why doesnt the Frenchman stab him? He will not get away before the Frenchman remembers his bayonet and stabs him...." And really another French soldier, trailing his musket, ran up to the struggling men, and the fate of the red-haired gunner, who had triumphantly secured the mop and still did not realize what awaited him, was about to be decided. But Prince Andrew did not see how it ended. It seemed to him as though one of the soldiers near him hit him on the head with the full swing of a bludgeon. It hurt a little, but the worst of it was that the pain distracted him and prevented his seeing what he had been looking at. "Whats this? Am I falling? My legs are giving way," thought he, and fell on his back. He opened his eyes, hoping to see how the struggle of the Frenchmen with the gunners ended, whether the red-haired gunner had been killed or not and whether the cannon had been captured or saved. But he saw nothing. Above him there was now nothing but the sky--the lofty sky, not clear yet still immeasurably lofty, with gray clouds gliding slowly across it. "How quiet, peaceful, and solemn; not at all as I ran," thought Prince Andrew--"not as we ran, shouting and fighting, not at all as the gunner and the Frenchman with frightened and angry faces struggled for the mop: how differently do those clouds glide across that lofty infinite sky! How was it I did not see that lofty sky before? And how happy I am to have found it at last! Yes! All is vanity, all falsehood, except that infinite sky. There is nothing, nothing, but that. But even it does not exist, there is nothing but quiet and peace. Thank God!..." CHAPTER XVII On our right flank commanded by Bagration, at nine oclock the battle had not yet begun. Not wishing to agree to Dolgorukovs demand to commence the action, and wishing to avert responsibility from himself, Prince Bagration proposed to Dolgorukov to send to inquire of the commander in chief. Bagration knew that as the distance between the two flanks was more than six miles, even if the messenger were not killed (which he very likely would be), and found the commander in chief (which would be very difficult), he would not be able to get back before evening. Bagration cast his large, expressionless, sleepy eyes round his suite, and the boyish face Rostov, breathless with excitement and hope, was the first to catch his eye. He sent him. "And if I should meet His Majesty before I meet the commander in chief, your excellency?" said Rostov, with his hand to his cap. "You can give the message to His Majesty," said Dolgorukov, hurriedly interrupting Bagration. On being relieved from picket duty Rostov had managed to get a few hours sleep before morning and felt cheerful, bold, and resolute, with elasticity of movement, faith in his good fortune, and generally in that state of mind which makes everything seem possible, pleasant, and easy. All his wishes were being fulfilled that morning: there was to be a general engagement in which he was taking part, more than that, he was orderly to the bravest general, and still more, he was going with a message to Kutuzov, perhaps even to the sovereign himself. The morning was bright, he had a good horse under him, and his heart was full of joy and happiness. On receiving the order he gave his horse the rein and galloped along the line. At first he rode along the line of Bagrations troops, which had not yet advanced into action but were standing motionless; then he came to the region occupied by Uvarovs cavalry and here he noticed a stir and signs of preparation for battle; having passed Uvarovs cavalry he clearly heard the sound of cannon and musketry ahead of him. The firing grew louder and louder. In the fresh morning air were now heard, not two or three musket shots at irregular intervals as before, followed by one or two cannon shots, but a roll of volleys of musketry from the slopes of the hill before Pratzen, interrupted by such frequent reports of cannon that sometimes several of them were not separated from one another

War And Peace page 163        War And Peace page 165