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his coat, and his solid, comely figure in his white shirt-sleeves, with his red perspiring face and his impulsive movements, made a picture that imprinted itself vividly on the memory. When Darya Alexandrovna lay in bed that night, as soon as she closed her eyes, she saw Vassenka Veslovsky flying about the croquet ground. During the game Darya Alexandrovna was not enjoying herself. She did not like the light tone of raillery that was kept up all the time between Vassenka Veslovsky and Anna, and the unnaturalness altogether of grown-up people, all alone without children, playing at a childs game. But to avoid breaking up the party and to get through the time somehow, after a rest she joined the game again, and pretended to be enjoying it. All that day it seemed to her as though she were acting in a theater with actors cleverer than she, and that her bad acting was spoiling the whole performance. She had come with the intention of staying two days, if all went well. But in the evening, during the game, she made up her mind that she would go home next day. The maternal cares and worries, which she had so hated on the way, now, after a day spent without them, struck her in quite another light, and tempted her back to them. When, after evening tea and a row by night in the boat, Darya Alexandrovna went alone to her room, took off her dress, and began arranging her thin hair for the night, she had a great sense of relief. It was positively disagreeable to her to think that Anna was coming to see her immediately. She longed to be alone with her own thoughts. Chapter 23 Dolly was wanting to go to bed when Anna came in to see her, attired for the night. In the course of the day Anna had several times begun to speak of matters near her heart, and every time after a few words she had stopped: "Afterwards, by ourselves, well talk about everything. Ive got so much I want to tell you," she said. Now they were by themselves, and Anna did not know what to talk about. She sat in the window looking at Dolly, and going over in her own mind all the stores of intimate talk which had seemed so inexhaustible beforehand, and she found nothing. At that moment it seemed to her that everything had been said already. "Well, what of Kitty?" she said with a heavy sigh, looking penitently at Dolly. "Tell me the truth, Dolly: isnt she angry with me?" "Angry? Oh, no!" said Darya Alexandrovna, smiling. "But she hates me, despises me?" "Oh, no! But you know that sort of thing isnt forgiven." "Yes, yes," said Anna, turning away and looking out of the open window. "But I was not to blame. And who is to blame? Whats the meaning of being to blame? Could it have been otherwise? What do you think? Could it possibly have happened that you didnt become the wife of Stiva?" "Really, I dont know. But this is what I want you to tell me..." "Yes, yes, but weve not finished about Kitty. Is she happy? Hes a very nice man, they say." "Hes much more than very nice. I dont know a better man." "Ah, how glad I am! Im so glad! Much more than very nice," she repeated. Dolly smiled. "But tell me about yourself. Weve a great deal to talk about. And Ive had a talk with..." Dolly did not know what to call him. She felt it awkward to call him either the count or Alexey Kirillovitch. "With Alexey," said Anna, "I know what you talked about. But I wanted to ask you directly what you think of me, of my life?" "How am I to say like that straight off? I really dont know." "No, tell me all the same.... You see my life. But you mustnt forget that youre seeing us in the summer, when you have come to us and we are not alone.... But we came here early in the spring, lived quite alone, and shall be alone again, and I desire nothing better. But imagine me living alone without him, alone, and that will be...I see by everything that it will often be repeated, that he will be half the time away from home," she said, getting up and sitting down close by Dolly. "Of

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