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Anna Karenina 345


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Anna Karenina

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raspberries, and there...I cant tell you really what she did. Its a thousand pities Miss Elliots not with us. This one sees to nothing--shes a machine.... _Figurez-vous que la petite_?..." And Darya Alexandrovna described Mashas crime. "That proves nothing; its not a question of evil propensities at all, its simply mischief," Levin assured her. "But you are upset about something? What have you come for?" asked Dolly. "Whats going on there?" And in the tone of her question Levin heard that it would be easy for him to say what he had meant to say. "Ive not been in there, Ive been alone in the garden with Kitty. Weve had a quarrel for the second time since...Stiva came." Dolly looked at him with her shrewd, comprehending eyes. "Come, tell me, honor bright, has there been...not in Kitty, but in that gentlemans behavior, a tone which might be unpleasant-- not unpleasant, but horrible, offensive to a husband?" "You mean, how shall I say.... Stay, stay in the corner!" she said to Masha, who, detecting a faint smile in her mothers face, had been turning round. "The opinion of the world would be that he is behaving as young men do behave. _Il fait la cour a une jeune et jolie femme_, and a husband whos a man of the world should only be flattered by it." "Yes, yes," said Levin gloomily; "but you noticed it?" "Not only I, but Stiva noticed it. Just after breakfast he said to me in so many words, _Je crois que Veslovsky fait un petit brin de cour a Kitty_." "Well, thats all right then; now Im satisfied. Ill send him away," said Levin. "What do you mean! Are you crazy?" Dolly cried in horror; "nonsense, Kostya, only think!" she said, laughing. "You can go now to Fanny," she said to Masha. "No, if you wish it, Ill speak to Stiva. Hell take him away. He can say youre expecting visitors. Altogether he doesnt fit into the house." "No, no, Ill do it myself." "But youll quarrel with him?" "Not a bit. I shall so enjoy it," Levin said, his eyes flashing with real enjoyment. "Come, forgive her, Dolly, she wont do it again," he said of the little sinner, who had not gone to Fanny, but was standing irresolutely before her mother, waiting and looking up from under her brows to catch her mothers eye. The mother glanced at her. The child broke into sobs, hid her face on her mothers lap, and Dolly laid her thin, tender hand on her head. "And what is there in common between us and him?" thought Levin, and he went off to look for Veslovsky. As he passed through the passage he gave orders for the carriage to be got ready to drive to the station. "The spring was broken yesterday," said the footman. "Well, the covered trap, then, and make haste. Wheres the visitor?" "The gentlemans gone to his room." Levin came upon Veslovsky at the moment when the latter, having unpacked his things from his trunk, and laid out some new songs, was putting on his gaiters to go out riding. Whether there was something exceptional in Levins face, or that Vassenka was himself conscious that _ce petit brin de cour_ he was making was out of place in this family, but he was somewhat (as much as a young man in society can be) disconcerted at Levins entrance. "You ride in gaiters?" "Yes, its much cleaner," said Vassenka, putting his fat leg on a chair, fastening the bottom hook, and smiling with simple-hearted good humor. He was undoubtedly a good-natured fellow, and Levin felt sorry for him and ashamed of himself, as his host, when he saw the shy look on Vassenkas face. On the table lay a piece of stick which they had broken together that morning, trying their strength. Levin took the fragment in his hands and began smashing it up, breaking bits off the stick, not knowing how to begin. "I wanted...." He paused, but suddenly, remembering Kitty and everything that had happened, he said, looking him resolutely in the face: "I have ordered the horses to be put-to for you." "How so?" Vassenka began in surprise. "To drive where?" "For you to drive to the station," Levin said gloomily. "Are you going away, or has something happened?" "It happens that I expect visitors," said Levin, his strong fingers more and more rapidly breaking off the ends of the split stick. "And Im not expecting visitors, and

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