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Anna Karenina 265


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and her son and lost her good name, she yet felt full of spirits, gaiety, and happiness. "Its in the guide-book," said Golenishtchev, referring to the palazzo Vronsky had taken. "Theres a first-rate Tintoretto there. One of his latest period." "I tell you what: its a lovely day, lets go and have another look at it," said Vronsky, addressing Anna. "I shall be very glad to; Ill go and put on my hat. Would you say its hot?" she said, stopping short in the doorway and looking inquiringly at Vronsky. And again a vivid flush overspread her face. Vronsky saw from her eyes that she did not know on what terms he cared to be with Golenishtchev, and so was afraid of not behaving as he would wish. He looked a long, tender look at her. "No, not very," he said. And it seemed to her that she understood everything, most of all, that he was pleased with her; and smiling to him, she walked with her rapid step out at the door. The friends glanced at one another, and a look of hesitation came into both faces, as though Golenishtchev, unmistakably admiring her, would have liked to say something about her, and could not find the right thing to say, while Vronsky desired and dreaded his doing so. "Well then," Vronsky began to start a conversation of some sort; "so youre settled here? Youre still at the same work, then?" he went on, recalling that he had been told Golenishtchev was writing something. "Yes, Im writing the second part of the _Two Elements_," said Golenishtchev, coloring with pleasure at the question--"that is, to be exact, I am not writing it yet; I am preparing, collecting materials. It will be of far wider scope, and will touch on almost all questions. We in Russia refuse to see that we are the heirs of Byzantium," and he launched into a long and heated explanation of his views. Vronsky at the first moment felt embarrassed at not even knowing of the first part of the _Two Elements_, of which the author spoke as something well known. But as Golenishtchev began to lay down his opinions and Vronsky was able to follow them even without knowing the _Two Elements_, he listened to him with some interest, for Golenishtchev spoke well. But Vronsky was startled and annoyed by the nervous irascibility with which Golenishtchev talked of the subject that engrossed him. As he went on talking, his eyes glittered more and more angrily; he was more and more hurried in his replies to imaginary opponents, and his face grew more and more excited and worried. Remembering Golenishtchev, a thin, lively, good-natured and well-bred boy, always at the head of the class, Vronsky could not make out the reason of his irritability, and he did not like it. What he particularly disliked was that Golenishtchev, a man belonging to a good set, should put himself on a level with some scribbling fellows, with whom he was irritated and angry. Was it worth it? Vronsky disliked it, yet he felt that Golenishtchev was unhappy, and was sorry for him. Unhappiness, almost mental derangement, was visible on his mobile, rather handsome face, while without even noticing Annas coming in, he went on hurriedly and hotly expressing his views. When Anna came in in her hat and cape, and her lovely hand rapidly swinging her parasol, and stood beside him, it was with a feeling of relief that Vronsky broke away from the plaintive eyes of Golenishtchev which fastened persistently upon him, and with a fresh rush of love looked at his charming companion, full of life and happiness. Golenishtchev recovered himself with an effort, and at first was dejected and gloomy, but Anna, disposed to feel friendly with everyone as she was at that time, soon revived his spirits by her direct and lively manner. After trying various subjects of conversation, she got him upon painting, of which he talked very well, and she listened to him attentively. They walked to the house they had taken, and looked over it. "I am very glad of one thing," said Anna to Golenishtchev when they were on their way back, "Alexey will have a capital _atelier_. You must certainly take that room," she said to Vronsky in Russian, using the affectionately familiar form as though she saw that Golenishtchev would become intimate with them in their isolation, and that there was no need of reserve before him. "Do you paint?" said Golenishtchev, turning round quickly to Vronsky. "Yes, I

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