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peasant got this done, and he could not say enough in praise of it as food for the beasts. "What have the wenches to do? They carry it out in bundles to the roadside, and the cart brings it away." "Well, we landowners cant manage well with our laborers," said Levin, handing him a glass of tea. "Thank you," said the old man, and he took the glass, but refused sugar, pointing to a lump he had left. "Theyre simple destruction," said he. "Look at Sviazhskys, for instance. We know what the lands like--first-rate, yet theres not much of a crop to boast of. Its not looked after enough--thats all it is!" "But you work your land with hired laborers?" "Were all peasants together. We go into everything ourselves. If a mans no use, he can go, and we can manage by ourselves." "Father, Finogen wants some tar," said the young woman in the clogs, coming in. "Yes, yes, thats how it is, sir!" said the old man, getting up, and crossing himself deliberately, he thanked Levin and went out. When Levin went into the kitchen to call his coachman he saw the whole family at dinner. The women were standing up waiting on them. The young, sturdy-looking son was telling something funny with his mouth full of pudding, and they were all laughing, the woman in the clogs, who was pouring cabbage soup into a bowl, laughing most merrily of all. Very probably the good-looking face of the young woman in the clogs had a good deal to do with the impression of well-being this peasant household made upon Levin, but the impression was so strong that Levin could never get rid of it. And all the way from the old peasants to Sviazhskys he kept recalling this peasant farm as though there were something in this impression that demanded his special attention. Chapter 26 Sviazhsky was the marshal of his district. He was five years older than Levin, and had long been married. His sister-in-law, a young girl Levin liked very much, lived in his house; and Levin knew that Sviazhsky and his wife would have greatly liked to marry the girl to him. He knew this with certainty, as so-called eligible young men always know it, though he could never have brought himself to speak of it to anyone; and he knew too that, although he wanted to get married, and although by every token this very attractive girl would make an excellent wife, he could no more have married her, even if he had not been in love with Kitty Shtcherbatskaya, than he could have flown up to the sky. And this knowledge poisoned the pleasure he had hoped to find in the visit to Sviazhsky. On getting Sviazhskys letter with the invitation for shooting, Levin had immediately thought of this; but in spite of it he had made up his mind that Sviazhskys having such views for him was simply his own groundless supposition, and so he would go, all the same. Besides, at the bottom of his heart he had a desire to try himself, put himself to the test in regard to this girl. The Sviazhskys home-life was exceedingly pleasant, and Sviazhsky himself, the best type of man taking part in local affairs that Levin knew, was very interesting to him. Sviazhsky was one of those people, always a source of wonder to Levin, whose convictions, very logical though never original, go one way by themselves, while their life, exceedingly definite and firm in its direction, goes its way quite apart and almost always in direct contradiction to their convictions. Sviazhsky was an extremely advanced man. He despised the nobility, and believed the mass of the nobility to be secretly in favor of serfdom, and only concealing their views from cowardice. He regarded Russia as a ruined country, rather after the style of Turkey, and the government of Russia as so bad that he never permitted himself to criticize its doings seriously, and yet he was a functionary of that government and a model marshal of nobility, and when he drove about he always wore the cockade of office and the cap with the red band. He considered human life only tolerable abroad, and went abroad to stay at every opportunity, and at the same time he carried on a complex and improved system of agriculture in Russia, and with extreme interest followed everything and knew everything that was being done in Russia. He considered the Russian

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