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Anna Karenina 104


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Anna Karenina

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About all her figure, and especially her head, there was a certain expression of energy, and, at the same time, of softness. She was one of those creatures which seem only not to speak because the mechanism of their mouth does not allow them to. To Vronsky, at any rate, it seemed that she understood all he felt at that moment, looking at her. Directly Vronsky went towards her, she drew in a deep breath, and, turning back her prominent eye till the white looked bloodshot, she started at the approaching figures from the opposite side, shaking her muzzle, and shifting lightly from one leg to the other. "There, you see how fidgety she is," said the Englishman. "There, darling! There!" said Vronsky, going up to the mare and speaking soothingly to her. But the nearer he came, the more excited she grew. Only when he stood by her head, she was suddenly quieter, while the muscles quivered under her soft, delicate coat. Vronsky patted her strong neck, straightened over her sharp withers a stray lock of her mane that had fallen on the other side, and moved his face near her dilated nostrils, transparent as a bats wing. She drew a loud breath and snorted out through her tense nostrils, started, pricked up her sharp ear, and put out her strong, black lip towards Vronsky, as though she would nip hold of his sleeve. But remembering the muzzle, she shook it and again began restlessly stamping one after the other her shapely legs. "Quiet, darling, quiet!" he said, patting her again over her hind-quarters; and with a glad sense that his mare was in the best possible condition, he went out of the horse-box. The mares excitement had infected Vronsky. He felt that his heart was throbbing, and that he, too, like the mare, longed to move, to bite; it was both dreadful and delicious. "Well, I rely on you, then," he said to the Englishman; "half-past six on the ground." "All right," said the Englishman. "Oh, where are you going, my lord?" he asked suddenly, using the title "my lord," which he had scarcely ever used before. Vronsky in amazement raised his head, and stared, as he knew how to stare, not into the Englishmans eyes, but at his forehead, astounded at the impertinence of his question. But realizing that in asking this the Englishman had been looking at him not as an employer, but as a jockey, he answered: "Ive got to go to Bryanskys; I shall be home within an hour." "How often Im asked that question today!" he said to himself, and he blushed, a thing which rarely happened to him. The Englishman looked gravely at him; and, as though he, too, knew where Vronsky was going, he added: "The great things to keep quiet before a race," said he; "dont get out of temper or upset about anything." "All right," answered Vronsky, smiling; and jumping into his carriage, he told the man to drive to Peterhof. Before he had driven many paces away, the dark clouds that had been threatening rain all day broke, and there was a heavy downpour of rain. "What a pity!" thought Vronsky, putting up the roof of the carriage. "It was muddy before, now it will be a perfect swamp." As he sat in solitude in the closed carriage, he took out his mothers letter and his brothers note, and read them through. Yes, it was the same thing over and over again. Everyone, his mother, his brother, everyone thought fit to interfere in the affairs of his heart. This interference aroused in him a feeling of angry hatred--a feeling he had rarely known before. "What business is it of theirs? Why does everybody feel called upon to concern himself about me? And why do they worry me so? Just because they see that this is something they cant understand. If it were a common, vulgar, worldly intrigue, they would have left me alone. They feel that this is something different, that this is not a mere pastime, that this woman is dearer to me than life. And this is incomprehensible, and thats why it annoys them. Whatever our destiny is or may be, we have made it ourselves, and we do not complain of it," he said, in the word _we_ linking himself with Anna. "No, they must needs teach us how to live. They havent an idea of what happiness is; they dont know that without our love, for

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