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Anna Karenina

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Anna Karenina at Emma Watson Pussy

Anna Karenina is a novel by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, published in serial installments from 1873 to 1877 in the periodical The Russian Messenger. Tolstoy clashed with its editor Mikhail Katkov over issues that arose in the final installment; therefore, the novel's first complete appearance was in book form. Tolstoy considered Anna Karenina his first true novel. The character of Anna was likely inspired, in part, by Maria Hartung, the elder daughter of the Russian poet Alexander Pushkin. Soon after meeting her at dinner, Tolstoy began reading Pushkin's prose and once had a fleeting daydream of "a bare exquisite aristocratic elbow", which proved to be the first intimation of Anna's character. Although most Russian critics panned the novel on its publication as a "trifling romance of high life", Fyodor Dostoevsky declared it to be "flawless as a work of art." His opinion was seconded by Vladimir Nabokov, who especially admired "the flawless magic of Tolstoy's style" and the motif of the moving train, subtly introduced in the first chapters and inexorably developed in subsequent chapters , heralding the novel's majestic finale. According to a recent poll of 125 contemporary authors, published in a book entitled The Top Ten, Anna Karenina is the greatest novel ever written

Plot summary

The novel is divided into eight parts. The novel begins with one of its most quoted lines:“ Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. ”
We are first introduced to the character Prince Stepan Arkadyevitch Oblonsky, "Stiva", a Moscow civil servant who has been unfaithful to his wife Darya Alexandrovna, "Dolly", and whose affair with the house governess has been found out. The house and family they live in are turned upside down owing to this discovery. Stiva's affair shows an amorous personality that he cannot seem to suppress. Conveniently, his married sister, Anna Arkadyevna Karenina, from Saint Petersburg is coming to visit and eventually persuades Dolly not to leave him. Meanwhile, Stiva's childhood friend Konstantin Dmitrievich Levin "Kostya" arrives in Moscow to ask for the hand of Dolly's youngest sister Ekaterina Alexandrovna Shcherbatskaya, "Kitty". The passionate, restless but shy aristocratic landowner lives on a large country estate that he manages. Kitty turns him down, expecting a marriage offer from army officer Count Alexei Kirillovich Vronsky. Despite his clear fondness for Kitty, Vronsky has no intention of marrying her. Stiva and Vronsky meet at the Moscow railway station to pick up their sister and mother respectively. Upon their arrival in Moscow, a railway worker accidentally falls in front of a train and is killed. Anna interprets this as an "evil omen." Vronsky soon falls in love with Anna after he meets her at the station and later dances the mazurka with her at a ball. Anna successfully initiates a reconciliation between her brother and Dolly, and becomes good friends with Kitty. Anna, shaken by her response to Vronsky, returns at once to Saint Petersburg. Vronsky tails her on the same train. Levin, on the other hand, returns to his estate farm, abandoning any hope of marriage, and Anna returns to her husband Alexei Alexandrovich Karenin, a senior government official, and their son Sergei ("Seryozha") in Petersburg...


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